Author Archives: Amy Kenyon

About Amy Kenyon

Amy Kenyon is a historian, writer and photographer.

The Lost Potential of Nostalgia

Presented at the Freud Museum, London, interdisciplinary conference on Nostalgia,  (9th March, 2019):  https://www.freud.org.uk/wp-content/uploads/2018/12/Nostalgia-Conference_Poster.pdf )     Of all the photographs in the old album, this is the one I return to again and again. A girl hugging her dog … Continue reading

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What Did You See? Truth, Power, and the Boys of Covington Catholic

During the twenties, so a story goes, Clemenceau, shortly before his death, found himself engaged in a friendly talk with a representative of the Weimar Republic on the question of guilt for the outbreak of the First World War. “What, … Continue reading

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The Threshold God

Side Door   (Streetlight Magazine, December 2017) “Why not sense that, incarnated in the door, there is a little threshold god?”  (Gaston Bachelard) I’m a man now and I can’t help but feel grateful to Deanie. She was fighting for … Continue reading

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An Act of Memory That Fails Us

Set 50 years in the past, Kathryn Bigelow’s film, Detroit, is an act of public memory, an excavation of a brutal history specific to the time and city in which it took place, yet recognizably American, immediate and unfinished. But … Continue reading

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Two Letters

Jackie Kennedy, Ray Bradbury, Suburbia, and Me (Belt Magazine, July 21, 2017) “Drifting snow, a near whiteout. Left at the end of our street and then over two blocks to a particular mailbox, the one next to the big highway … Continue reading

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All the World Is (Not) a Stage

All the World Is (Not) a Stage  (Huffington Post, November 11, 2016)

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Sally Draper at the Ford Rotunda

“It may indeed be questioned whether we have any memories at all from our childhood: memories relating to our childhood may be all that we possess.” (Freud, Screen Memories, 1899) Read Sally Draper at the Ford Rotunda (published by Eclectica … Continue reading

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Belle Isle Aquarium

Belle Isle Aquarium is the winner of Streetlight Magazine‘s 2016 short fiction contest. Nina held her hand as they moved slowly through the large gallery beneath an arched ceiling of sea-green glass tiles. From one walled tank to another, each … Continue reading

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Songbook: For All We Know

Huffington Post (25.07.2017) Each parting in life diminishes us in some measure, and we may pause to wonder if it is the last one. Time and events will intervene sooner or later. Accidents. Illnesses. Cells age and mutate. Breaths become … Continue reading

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Lighted Field

“In an unknown world at the edge of Detroit, there is a green diamond ablaze beneath the sky. We, the young ones in this place of pattern houses, call it the Lighted Field.” Read more of this sketch, one of … Continue reading

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Sugarbush Lake

The homemade docks at Sugarbush promise firm ground, a stone path leading to a cottage, a mother and father, a clearing in the trees, and a gravel road back to town, because life asks to be lived. (read more) Sugarbush … Continue reading

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Of Rumor and Riot

This essay appeared in Belt Magazine (July 22, 2015) and was nominated for the Pushcart Prize. For an easier read, please see PDF version here: Of Rumour and Riot

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American Dreamers: Badlands’ Kit Carruthers and Holly Sargis

This essay appeared in Bright Lights Film Journal (November 4, 2014) American Dreamers: Badlands’ Kit Carruthers and Holly Sargis If Badlands is a story outside history, as Malick claims, then Kit is bent on creating one for himself, a history of … Continue reading

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Why I Dream of Opening Day

(A version of this essay appears in the Fall 2014 Issue of Cobalt Review) http://www.cobaltreview.com/ Born in Detroit in 1892, my grandfather was a Tiger fan all his life. For more than half of the twentieth century, decade after decade, … Continue reading

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History, Geography and Renisha McBride (Editorial piece for the Detroit News, November 18, 2013) The geographer William Bunge wrote that “no stronger indication of the power of white racism can be found than its ability to hide historic geography.” I … Continue reading

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Where were you when Detroit failed?

(Editorial piece for the Detroit News: August 13, 2013) “Where was I? I was living quietly in the suburbs, officer! This bankruptcy business has nothing to do with me!” This is the answer I once might have given, before I … Continue reading

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Author’s Q&A / University of Michigan Press

Q&A for Ford Road Ford Road, a new Michigan-based novel by historian Amy Kenyon, tells the story of Kay Seger, a historical consultant to a Los Angeles film company who abandons her career to return to her childhood home in … Continue reading

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Ford Road

Amy’s new novel, Ford Road, is now available.

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Cigars, c1920

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Slide dreams

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Middleville, Michigan c1930

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Middleville, Michigan c1928

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Thornapple River, c1922

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“Automobiles have come”

The Magnificent Ambersons (1942)

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Automobile, Barry County, Michigan c1929

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Singer, c1939

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Waiting

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Bennett Park (pre-Tiger Stadium), Detroit, c1910

My grandfather, Fred Granger – third from left and wearing the black hat – in the old wildcat stands at Bennett Park.  With all good wishes to the Detroit Tigers at the start of the 2012 season.

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